Jan 24 2015

Lorraine Daston gives Inaugural Northern Theory School Public Lecture

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Inaugural Northern Theory School Annual Public Lecture

‘Rules, Models, and Paradigms: Before Rules Became Rigid’

Lorraine Daston (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin)

Rules – in the form of everything from traffic regulations and government directives to etiquette manuals and parliamentary procedures – structure almost every human interaction. Increasing use of computers has intensified a trend that began in the eighteenth century of ever more, ever more rigid rules for ever more domains of public and private life. But the algorithm became the prototypical rule only relatively recently, in the late nineteenth century. The long history of rules prior to that point shows surprising affinities with concepts now considered to be the antithesis of rule-following, such as thinking in terms of models and paradigms. Sources as disparate as the rules of monastic orders to textbooks of commercial arithmetic to cookbooks reveal a hidden history of the premodern rule.

Professor Lorraine Daston is Executive Director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG) in Berlin, and Visiting Professor in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of  Arts and Sciences, Corresponding Member of the British Academy, and Member of both the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and the Leopoldina Academy of Sciences. In 2010 she was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite of the Federal Republic of Germany, and in 2012 the History of Science Society’s Sarton Medal.

She has taught at Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Brandeis, the University of Göttingen, and the University of Chicago and held visiting positions at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, the University of Vienna, and Oxford University (Isaiah Berlin Lectures in the History of Ideas).

Her books include Classical Probability in the Enlightenment (Princeton University Press, 1988), Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750 (Zone, 1998, with Katharine Park), both of which were awarded the Pfizer Prize of the History of Science Society, Thinking with Animals (Columbia University Press, 2006, with Gregg Mitmann), Things That Talk (Zone, 2007), Objectivity (MIT, 2007, with Peter Galison) and Histories of Scientific Observation (Chicago University Press, 2011).

6.00 pm

23rd March 2015

Lancaster University

Please contact Arthur Bradley (a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk) to reserve a place.


Jan 14 2015

Adam Phillips on Psychoanalysis, Morality and the Senses

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Sensing the Arts

Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Arts and Languages (CIDRAL) at the University of Manchester

Roundtable with Adam Phillips: Psychoanalysis, Morality and the Senses

Adam Phillips with Dr Monica Pearl and Professor Ian Parker. Chair: Professor Jackie Stacey (CIDRAL Director)

Recommended background readings:

1. ‘Punishing Parents’ in One Way and Another (2013), pp. 351-371

2. ‘On Satisfaction’  Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life  (2012), pp. 137-168

3. ‘On a More Impersonal Note’ in Intimacies (Leo Bersani and Adam Phillips) (2008), pp. 89-117

Additional background reading:

4. ’The Pragmatics of Passion’ (Ch 20) Promises, Promises: Essays on Literature and Psychoanalysis (2000), pp. 296-309

(PDFs available at: http://events.manchester.ac.uk/event/event:ki-hwl172v1-d9rs2u)

Adam Phillips is a freelance psychoanalyst and wrier. After studying English at the University of Oxford, he trained as a child psychotherapist and became Principal Child Psychotherapist at Charing Cross Hospital in London. He is the author of nineteen books, including: Winnicott (1988), On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored (1993), Monogamy (1996), Houdini’s Box (2001), Missing Out (2012), One Way and Another (2013). A regular contributor to the London Review of Books, Raritan, and The Threepenny Review, Phillips is also the general editor of new translations of Freud’s work published by the Penguin Press.

Dr Monica Pearl is Lecturer in Twentieth Century American Literature at the University of Manchester. She is the author of AIDS Literature and Gay Identity: The Literature of Loss (Routledge, 2013) and essays on the graphic memoir Fun Home, the play Angels in America, the writing of W.G. Sebald, and opera.

Professor Ian Parker is Professor of Management in the School of Management at the University of Leicester, Co-Director of the Discourse Unit (www.discourseunit.com), secretary of Manchester Psychoanalytic Matrix and a practising psychoanalyst in Manchester. He is also Honorary Professor of Education at the University of Manchester. His recent books include Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Revolutions in Subjectivity (Routledge, 2011), and six books in the series ‘Psychology after Critique’ (Routledge, 2015).

3.30-5.30pm, 4 February 2015

University Place Lecture Theatre A,

University of Manchester

Followed by wine reception at Cafe Muse.

For more information: email: clara.bradbury-rance@manchester.ac.uk, go to www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/cidral/ or tweet @cidral_uom


Nov 7 2014

Bill Brown on Obsolescence

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‘The Obsolescence of the Human’

A Lecture by Professor Bill Brown (University of Chicago) at the University of Leeds.

This lecture will focus on questions of obsolescence in general before addressing the eagerness (in the work of Bruno Latour above all) to do away with the human/unhuman distinction.

Professor Brown is Karla Scherer Distinguished Service Professor in American Culture at the University of Chicago and works at the intersection of literary, visual, and material cultures. He is author of, amongst other works, A Sense of Things: The Object Matter of American Literature and co-editor of Critical Enquiry.

5.00 pm

Thursday, 4th December

The Alumni Room, House 10 of The School of English.

University of Leeds  

Please contact Dr Sam Durrant at s.r.durrant@leeds.ac.uk for further information.


Oct 27 2014

Commemorating Derrida

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A Symposium on the Legacy of Jacques Derrida at the University of York

Speakers:

Arthur Bradley (Lancaster University)

John Bowen (University of York)

Ziad Elmarsafy (University of York)

Jacques Derrida’s writings have provoked strong feelings among critics of all stripes. In this special event to commemorate Derrida ten years after his death, three distinguished speakers will address how his writing has affected the ways they think and write about literature. More often heatedly discussed than closely read, Derrida’s prose poses a singular challenge to a group dedicated to questions of interpretation. Each of our speakers will therefore discuss a single page of Derrida, outlining how it has influenced the ways they read.

Arthur Bradley (Lancaster) will address an excerpt from Of Grammatology, John Bowen (York) a page from The Post Card, and Ziad Elmarsafy (York) a passage from ‘Hospitality’. These short presentations will be followed by open discussion. We hope this event will provide an accessible approach to a thinker whose name is often considered synonymous with difficulty and obscurity. All comers are welcome, from the post-structural sceptic to the deconstruction devotee. This event will take place at the University of York from 6:00pm on Wednesday 12 November.

This event is part of the Reading and Interpretation event series for staff and postgraduates interested in questions about how and why we read literature. For more information about the group and copies of reading material please visit our website or contact Alex Alonso or Doug Battersby.

The Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building

University of York

12 November 6:00pm

 


Sep 22 2014

Modern Tragedy: Antigone in Contemporary Thinking

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A Symposium with Professor Kathrin Rosenfield (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) at Lancaster University.

Speakers:

Kathrin Rosenfield (University of Rio Grande do Sul)

Michael Dillon (Lancaster University)

James Smith (University of Exeter)

Hegel calls the ‘heavenly’ Antigone ‘the most magnificent figure ever to have appeared on earth’. Hölderlin brought this heavenly figure to life all over again in a startlingly original German translation of Sophocles’ play, at the time dismissed by the circle around Goethe as unorthodox.  Heidegger, Derrida, Butler – indeed successive waves of German, French and Anglophone writers – have revisited both the play and the figure to develop interpretations across the spectrum of contemporary thought.  Antigone and her meaning (or the absence of any) haunts the thought of modernity.

Lancaster University, in conjunction with the Northern Theory School, has invited Professor Kathrin Rosenfield to present the fruits of more than a decade’s research into the Greek and German presentation of Antigone at a public event on Friday, 28th November. In addition to invited speakers, we also welcome brief contributions to the day (papers of 15 minutes maximum) on any aspect of Antigone, on Hölderlin or Hegel’s understanding of ‘the tragic’, and on the contemporary reception of her person, the play, or its tragic consequences, for consideration for inclusion in the event.

Kathrin Rosenfield is Professor in the Faculty of Literature and Philosophy at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil.  Educated in Salzburg, Vienna and Paris, she has authored two books on Sophocles and Hölderlin: Antigone: Sophocles’ Art, Hölderlin’s Insight (Aurora CO: Davies, 2010) and Oedipus Rex: The Story of a Palace Intrigue (Aurora CO: Davies, 2012).  Both books were simultaneously published in French. As well as being a philosopher and literary theorist, Kathrin Rosenfield is an accomplished performance artist.  Her book Desenverdando Rosa won Brazil’s foremost literary award in 2007.

Please note: attendance at the event is free, but requires advance registration. Please contact either Laurence Hemming (l.p.hemming@lancaster.ac.uk) or Arthur Bradley (a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk) to register.

1.00 pm – 5 pm, Friday 28th November

Management School Lecture Theatre 9

Lancaster University


Jun 11 2014

Simon Swift on Romanticism

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‘Hannah Arendt and Wordsworth’s The Ruined Cottage: Ruin, Ruination, Culture’

Dr Simon Swift (University of Leeds)

Simon Swift is Senior Lecturer in Critical and Cultural Theory at the University of Leeds. He is the author of Romanticism, Literature and Philosophy: Expressive Rationality in Rousseau, Kant, Wollstonecraft and Contemporary Theory and Hannah Arendt.

10 am – 1 pm, Thursday 26th June

Institute of Advanced Study

Millburn House

University of Warwick


May 22 2014

Zygmunt Bauman on Europe

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‘Quo Vadis Europe?’

A Public Lecture by Professor Zygmunt Bauman (Leeds) at the University of Manchester

Zygmunt Bauman is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Leeds. He is the author of many books including most recently Culture in a Liquid Modern World (Polity, 2011), This is Not a Diary (Polity, 2012) and What Use is Sociology? (Polity, 2013).

4. 30-6-30 pm, Monday, June 9th

Cordingley Lecture Theatre (Humanities Bridgeford Street)

University of Manchester

 

May 10 2014

Political Theology and Modernity: The Legacy of Carl Schmitt

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A One Day Research Symposium at Lancaster University with Professor William Rasch (Indiana University)

The Northern Theory School in conjunction with the Journal for Cultural Research (Taylor & Francis) and the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University is pleased to announce a one-day research symposium on Political Theology and Modernity: The Legacy of Carl Schmitt. Its keynote speaker will be Professor William Rasch (Indiana) and other speakers will include Agata Bielik-Robson (Nottingham), Michael Dillon (Lancaster) and Michael Hoelzl (Manchester). This event will be of interest to academics and graduate students interested in the legacy of Carl Schmitt, political theology and the relationship between religion and politics more widely.

William Rasch is Professor of Germanic Studies in the Department of Germanic Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of Niklas Luhmann’s Modernity: The Paradoxes of Differentiation (Stanford UP, 2001) and Sovereignty and its Discontents: On the Primacy of Conflict and the Structure of the Political (Birkbeck Law Press, 2004). He is Visiting Professor at Lancaster University in June 2014.

Monday 9th June 9. 30 am -5. 30 pm

Lecture Theatre 6, Management School

Lancaster University

This event is free and open to all but space is limited. In order to register, please contact Laurence Hemming (l.p.hemming@lancaster.ac.uk) or Arthur Bradley (a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk).


May 10 2014

Svetlana Boym on Ruins

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‘Embarrassing Monumentality in the Wake of the Cold War’

A Public Lecture at the University of Manchester by Svetlana Boym (Harvard University)

This lecture explores the ruins of modernity and metamorphosis of monuments across media—in public art, architecture and literature. It proposes an alternative off-modern history of the Cold War period beyond ruinophilia and iconoclasm. The discussion will examine the ‘monument to the Cold War’ and the embarrassing monumentality in the works by Robert Smithson, Vladimir Nabokov, Pussy Riots and others.

Svetlana Boym is a writer, theorist, and artist. Her books include The Future of Nostalgia (2001); Another Freedom: The Alternative History of an Idea (2010); Architecture of the Off-Modern (2008); Territories of Terror: Memories and Mythologies of Gulag in Contemporary Art (2006); the novel Ninochka (2003) and the play The Woman Who Shot Lenin. Among her exhibitions are Off-Modern: Ruins of the Future (Moscow Biennial, 2013); Phantasmagorias of History (Watchtower, off-Berlin Biennale, 2010); and Hydrants Immigrants (Parson’s School of Design in New York City, 2011). Boym is the Curt Hugo Reisinger Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literatures at Harvard University and a faculty associate of the Graduate School of Design and Architecture. Native of St Petersburg, Russia, she lives in Boston, USA and at www.svetlanaboym.com

5-7pm Tuesday 13th May

John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Building

University of Manchester


Apr 25 2014

Cressida Heyes on Rape

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‘Sleep, “Night”, and Bodily Anonymity: The Harms of Rape While Unconscious’

A Public Lecture at Durham University by Professor Cressida Heyes (University of Alberta)

Recent media coverage has drawn attention to cases of women sexually assaulted while unconscious. The most sensationalized involve young white women being assaulted by young men at parties while drunk. But case law and reports from advocacy groups indicate the problem of sexual assault of unconscious women is widespread and more complex–including violation of women who are medically vulnerable, pre-meditated drug-facilitated sexual assault, and opportunistic sexual violence that disproportionately affects women marginalized by poverty, under-housing, domestic abuse, and sexualized racism. This lecture draws on existential phenomenology to make sense of the distinctive bodily harms of sexual assault–especially rape–on unconscious, semi-conscious, and waking women. While rape clearly fails to recognize subjectivity understood as individuality, it also negates the possibility of anonymity, and, as it involves unconsciousness, the possibility of balancing the experience of “night” with moving out into the world.

Cressida Heyes holds the Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Alberta. Her publications include Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies (2007), The Grammar of Politics: Wittgenstein and Political Philosophy (Ithaca 2003), and the volume Cosmetic Surgery: A Feminist Primer (2009, with Meredith Jones). She holds a BA (Hons) in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics from Oxford University, an MA in Political Science, and a PhD in Philosophy, both from McGill University.

7th May 2014, 5 pm, ER140, Elvet Riverside, Durham University

This lecture is jointly hosted by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and the Institute of Advanced Study, as part of the Languages of Light series. All welcome. For further details contact caitriona.nidhuill@durham.ac.uk.