Nov 22 2018

Futures of Sacrifice

Stroumsa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Futures of Sacrifice: Sacrifice, Martyrdom, Self-Immolation

An International Symposium with Guy G. Stroumsa

Keynote speakers:

Terry Eagleton (Lancaster University)

Yvonne Sherwood (University of Kent)

Guy G. Stroumsa (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

In one very literal sense, philosophy begins with an act of self-sacrifice: the death of Socrates. It is all the more remarkable, then, that modern thought seems to find little or no place whatsoever for sacrifice. As many scholars have documented, liberal political philosophy’s foundational claim is the so-called natural law or right of self-preservation: human beings want to preserve their biological existence for as long as possible and the highest good of any form of political state is to protect and sustain that existence. To re-read the canonical signatures of modern liberalism from Thomas Hobbes to John Locke, then, we this find (despite or because of their many differences) a common aim to abolish, exclude – or even paradoxically sacrifice – sacrifice itself: the very idea of sacrificing life to some higher good than biological existence is apparently no longer thinkable. If liberalism thus seems to constitute the political euthanasia of sacrifice itself – the painless putting-out-of-its-misery of an eldery relative who has outlived her usefulness – sacrifice nonetheless refuses to die or disappear. In his recent book Radical Sacrifice, Terry Eagleton concludes that ’revolution is a modern version of what the ancient world knew as sacrifice’. This international symposium gathers together a range of scholars from the disciplines of philosophy, theology and politics – including the renowned historian of religion Guy G. Stroumsa – to consider the past, present and future of sacrifice.

Guy G. Stroumsa is Martin Buber Professor Emeritus of Comparative Religion at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Emeritus Professor of the Study of the Abrahamic Religions at the University of Oxford. He is the author of many works on comparative religion from late antiquity to modernity including The Making of the Abrahamic Religions in Late Antiquity (Oxford, 2015) and The Scriptural Universe of Ancient Christianity (Harvard, 2016). In 2010, his lectures at the College de France were translated into English as The End of Sacrifice with Chicago University Press.

Friday 30th November

Ruskin Library and Research Centre

Lancaster University

 

 


Apr 27 2018

Just Between Us: A Workshop on Gender and Intersubjectivity

intersubjectivity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A workshop, introduced by Anna Yeatman (Western Syndney University) and Alison Stone (Lancaster University), with some inital questions by Laurence Hemming (Lancaster University).

Anna Yeatman FASSA, is Professor in the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney. Her background is in political and social thought, and she has led public policy evaluati0ns in the human services. Her published work has focused on the impact of managerialism and neoliberalism on social and life and practice. She has also published on intersubjectivity and freedom, and feminism and the technological age.

Alison Stone is Professor of European Philosophy at Lancaster University. She is the author of Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference (Cambridge, 2006), Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Maternal Subjectivity (Routledge, 2011) as well as an introductory textbook on feminist philosophy.

Laurence Hemming is Research Professor in the Departments of Politics, Philosophy and Religion and Organisation, Work and Technology at Lancaster University. In 2016, he gave 5 lectures entitled ‘You and Me: Thinking Being Together’ at the Northern Theory School in Lancaster. He has written extensively on Martin Heidegger and recently published (with Bogdan Costea) a translation of Ernst Jünger’s The Worker.

Tuesday 8th May 5pm-6.30pm

Charles Carter A17

Lancaster University

All Welcome


May 6 2016

Critical Theory and Life: Ethics, Religion, Ecology

436892a-i1.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Conference Universitaire de Suisse Occidentale doctoral workshop at the University of Geneva 

Speakers:

Ann-Lise Francois (University of California, Berkeley)

Arthur Bradley (Lancaster University)

This one-day doctoral workshop aims to examine the situation of theoretical work in English studies in the early Twenty-First Century. Despite millennial proclamations of the ‘death of theory,’ critical theory remains alive and kicking. Indeed, the status of ‘life’ and ‘the living’ are key areas of contemporary theoretical interest. The continued need for theory in our era is often read as part of a larger ‘ethical turn’ in philosophy, but a range of questions about ‘life’ might provide a more politically-pertinent way of imagining this need. Such an interest stretches from a concern with the possible futures for biological life on earth in the era of the anthropocene, through to the rediscovered interest in political theology and biopolitics (or the politicization of life) in our era. These concerns and interests find theirhistorical place in the context of increasingly urgent modes of address to the diminished possibilities and hopes for everyday life post-2008, and they articulate the ways in which the very affective states of hope and optimism, as well as economic practices of enclosure and reserve that bind bodies to the political economies of the western world have become, to quote Lauren Berlant, ‘cruel.’ The day will be book-ended by interventions from our two speakers, whose work addresses in profoundly distinctive ways different aspects of these turns in recent theory. Each participant will also be invited to select a theoretical text that has shaped their way of reading literature, and to describe the impact of that text on their own work. Short excerpts from each text will be circulated to all participants beforehand. Our keynotes will be asked to do likewise, and in the morning, a reading group will be organised around their chosen texts. In the afternoon, doctoral students will be invited to present their work in progress, and to articulate the ways in which their work can be seen to be in dialogue with the theme of the workshop. The aim of the workshop is to be as inclusive as possible-it is not meant solely for those working on different aspects of critical theory or contemporary literature (while participants working in these areas will of course be extremely welcome). Indeed, the very fact that this workshop aims to examine theory in the context of a history of the present invites a range of responses. Those working on, say, early modern or Medieval religion, or on the body/affect, or those who simply want to get up to speed with current trends in theory, and to connect their own work with it, are very welcome.

10.00-5.30 May 26th 2016

University of Geneva

Conference Universitaire de Suisse Occidentale

Register at: https://english.cuso.ch/upcoming-modules/