Apr 18 2014

Lyndsey Stonebridge on Life

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A Critical Life Workshop with Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (UEA) at the University of Leeds.

Lyndsey Stonebridge is Professor of Literature and Critical Theory at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of The Destructive Element: British Psychoanalysis and Modernism (1998) and The Writing of Anxiety (2007) and co-author of British Fiction After Modernism (2007). Her most recent book, The Judicial Imagination: Writing after Nuremberg (2011), takes the work of Hannah Arendt as a theoretical starting point in order to think about the relation between law, justice and literature in the postwar period. This workshop will be organised around aspects of Professor Stonebridge’s recent research and will also involve a more general discussion of theory and the academic job market in the era of the REF. It will comprise three parts:

  • Masterclass led by Prof. Stonebridge: Hannah Arendt’s writing on Kafka (reading to be circulated in advance)
  • Lecture: Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge on ‘Statelessness and Modern Literature’
  • Roundtable (staff and PG students): on Theory and the academic job market in the era of REF and ‘impact’

Please note: staff and postgraduate students are all welcome but numbers are limited. To reserve a place please email Nicholas Ray at n.j.ray@leeds.ac.uk. 

This event is free of charge. Postgraduate students at institutions belonging to the Northern Theory School are eligible to apply for a travel bursary of up to £30. There are 10 available. To apply, email Nicholas Ray (n.j.ray@leeds.ac.uk) stating your name, institution and supervisor.

May 14, 11.30am–5.00pm, Leeds Humanities Research Institute, University of Leeds.

This event is hosted by the School of English, University of Leeds.

 


Jan 24 2014

Walter Benjamin: All Shades of Gnosis

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A workshop with Professor Agata Bielik-Robson (University of Nottingham) on political theology, divine violence and tragedy in the thought of Benjamin.

Agata Bielik-Robson is Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of Nottingham. She has published widely in all areas of Jewish philosophy with special emphasis paid on modern Jewish thought, from Spinoza to Derrida. She also researches contemporary philosophy and psychoanalysis, particularly when in a dialogue (or polemic) with theology. This workshop will be of benefit to Benjamin scholars (or those curious about his work) across a spectrum of disciplines: critical theory, philosophy, theology, art history, literature and beyond.

Friday 28th February, 3.00-5.30 pm

Leeds Humanities Research Institute, 29-31 Clarendon Place

University of Leeds

In order to reserve a place, please contact Stefan Skrimshire (s.skrimshire@leeds.ac.uk).

This event is hosted by the Quilting Points reading group at the University of Leeds and the Northern Theory School. It is generously supported by the Leeds Humanities Research Institute.

 


Jan 2 2014

Howard Caygill on Sovereignty

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Howard Caygill (Kingston University) 

Howard Caygill is Professor of Modern European Philosophy in the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University. His most recent book is On Resistance: A Philosophy of Defiance (Bloomsbury, 2013).

Respondent: Professor Maja Zehfuss (University of Manchester)

5 pm, Tuesday 18th February

County Main Seminar Room 1

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Lancaster University

In order to reserve a place, please contact Arthur Bradley: a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk


Dec 2 2013

Foucault’s Iran: Religion, Politics, Revolution

Foucault Iran

 

 

 

 

 

A workshop on Michel Foucault’s writings on the Iranian Revolution led by Professor Michael Dillon (Lancaster University).

In 1978, Michel Foucault visited Iran twice as the protests against the Shah reached their zenith and subsequently interviewed the Ayatollah Khomenei in his Paris exile. He went on to write a series of articles for the Corrierre della sera, Le nouvel observateur and Le monde reflecting upon the implications of the Islamic Revolution. To be sure, Foucault’s writings upon Iran are now some of the notorious in his body of work and have been roundly criticised by scholars for at best political naivete and at worst complicity with Khomenei’s regime. However, after more than 30 years of radical political Islamism of all persuasions, the ‘Iranian’ Foucault also begins to seem remarkably prescient, almost prophetic: Foucault was arguably one of the first western thinkers to grasp the complex nexus of religion and revolutionary politics that has become one of the defining challenges to neo-liberal modernity. What, then, are we to make of the Iranian Foucault today? How might we read it in the light of subsequent debates around resistance, biopolitics, political theology, not to mention a new set of revolutions in the Middle East? Why does Foucault speak of a new ‘political spirituality’ beginning to be born in the Islamic Revolution?

2-5 pm, LICA Room A05, Tuesday 17th December, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Lancaster University.

Please note: this event is free but places are strictly limited. In order to reserve a place, contact Arthur Bradley on a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk.