Apr 27 2018

Just Between Us: A Workshop on Gender and Intersubjectivity

intersubjectivity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A workshop, introduced by Anna Yeatman (Western Syndney University) and Alison Stone (Lancaster University), with some inital questions by Laurence Hemming (Lancaster University).

Anna Yeatman FASSA, is Professor in the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney. Her background is in political and social thought, and she has led public policy evaluati0ns in the human services. Her published work has focused on the impact of managerialism and neoliberalism on social and life and practice. She has also published on intersubjectivity and freedom, and feminism and the technological age.

Alison Stone is Professor of European Philosophy at Lancaster University. She is the author of Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference (Cambridge, 2006), Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Maternal Subjectivity (Routledge, 2011) as well as an introductory textbook on feminist philosophy.

Laurence Hemming is Research Professor in the Departments of Politics, Philosophy and Religion and Organisation, Work and Technology at Lancaster University. In 2016, he gave 5 lectures entitled ‘You and Me: Thinking Being Together’ at the Northern Theory School in Lancaster. He has written extensively on Martin Heidegger and recently published (with Bogdan Costea) a translation of Ernst Jünger’s The Worker.

Tuesday 8th May 5pm-6.30pm

Charles Carter A17

Lancaster University

All Welcome


Mar 19 2017

Literature and Inequality

inequality (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An international Conference on Culture, Society and Economy

‘We wish, in a word, equality.’ – Mikhail Bakunin

Keynote speakers:

Jennifer Ashton (University of Illinois-Chicago)

Walter Ben Michaels (University of Illinois-Chicago)

Jane Elliott (King’s College London)

Annie Mcclanahan (University of California, Irvine)

Kenneth Warren (University of Chicago)

To call economic inequality a ‘problem’ is probably to say too little about it. Equality is not just a function of modern life, which may fail to work under certain conditions. Equality is a horizon of expectation. What then makes advanced contemporary society, especially in nations like the US and UK, so economically unequal? Certainly there are conditions of the market since the Second World War, despite all its successes, that have operated against equality – not as a failure of capitalism but as an expression of its nature. This was observed as early as 1958 by John Kenneth Galbraith and 1970 by Jean Baudrillard. It has recently become a dominant theoretical postulate since the publication of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century (2013).

Does literature have anything to do with this? Does it have something to so with creating a culture where inequality has been increasingly tolerated, or even promoted? Does it have something to do with the effacement of that horizon of expectation of an equality to come?  Or has literature been a force of resistance or a zone of neutral alterity? Is it fair even to ask of literature and literary studies that they address the problem of economic inequality? We know about reformers like Charles Dickens and Elizabeth Gaskell. But where are the reformers now? Is anybody listening? Does it matter? ‘The entire U.S. school system, from pre-K up’, wrote Walter Benn Michaels a decade ago’ ‘is structured from the very start to enable the rich to out-compete the poor, which is to say, the race is fixed’. Since then the gap between the rich and everyone else has only grown in most of the developed world, even in Sweden, and we critics and teachers find ourselves complicit in one of the main institutions of economic and cultural division. Our interest in this conference is manifold: first, in the representation of economic relations in literature, and what it may or may not have to tell us; second, in the institutions of literary production, and how they work in relation to economic inequality; third, in the institutions of higher education, which promote cultural aspiration at the expense of inequality; fourth, in the history of all this, going back to the origins of capitalism.

We invite proposals for presentations of up to 20 minutes on literature and theory in any language. The conference language is English. Proposals about any period since 1550 are welcome. We are especially interested in inequality in the context of modern economies, beginning with the Industrial Revolution, and seeing how literature has adapted to changes in productive powers and the distributions of income. We also welcome contributions on subjects related to literature – from film and TV to Internet writing. A limited amount of funding is available for all participants to help cover travel and accommodation costs.

Submissions of up to 500 words including biographical information should be sent by 1 May 2017 to the conference organisers:

Robert Appelbaum: robert.appelbaum@engelska.uu.se

Roberto del Valle Alcalá: roberto.valle@engelska.uu.se

For more information about the conference, please go to: https://reg.akademikonferens.se/app/netattm/attendee/page/55841

Uppsala University

Sweden

26-28 October