Jun 8 2015

Futures of the Archive: Theory, Criticism, Crisis

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A new book series from Rowman and Littlefield International in partnership with the Northern Theory School

Edited by Arthur Bradley (Lancaster University) and Simon Swift (University of Geneva)

What will be the future of critical theory’s past? This new series offers a set of radical interdisciplinary interventions which explore how the history of critical theory can contribute to an understanding of the contemporary.

By returning to classic critical debates in philosophy, politics, aesthetics, religion and more, the volumes in this series seek to provide a new insight into the crises of our present moment: capitalism, revolution, biopolitics, human rights, the animal and the anthropocene.

In this way, Futures of the Archive shows that the past – and in particular critical theory’s own past – is not a dead letter, but an archive to which we still belong and which continues to shape our present and future.

International Advisory Board: 

Robert Appelbaum (University of Uppsala)

Howard Caygill (Kingston University)

Terry Eagleton (Lancaster University)

Paul Hamilton (Queen Mary, University of London)

J. Hillis Miller (University of California at Irvine)

Yvonne Sherwood (University of Kent)

Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of East Anglia)

Rei Terada (University of California at Irvine)

Samuel Weber (Northwestern University)

In order to discuss or propose a submission, please contact Arthur Bradley and Simon Swift.


Jan 14 2015

Adam Phillips on Psychoanalysis, Morality and the Senses

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Sensing the Arts

Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Arts and Languages (CIDRAL) at the University of Manchester

Roundtable with Adam Phillips: Psychoanalysis, Morality and the Senses

Adam Phillips with Dr Monica Pearl and Professor Ian Parker. Chair: Professor Jackie Stacey (CIDRAL Director)

Recommended background readings:

1. ‘Punishing Parents’ in One Way and Another (2013), pp. 351-371

2. ‘On Satisfaction’  Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life  (2012), pp. 137-168

3. ‘On a More Impersonal Note’ in Intimacies (Leo Bersani and Adam Phillips) (2008), pp. 89-117

Additional background reading:

4. ’The Pragmatics of Passion’ (Ch 20) Promises, Promises: Essays on Literature and Psychoanalysis (2000), pp. 296-309

(PDFs available at: http://events.manchester.ac.uk/event/event:ki-hwl172v1-d9rs2u)

Adam Phillips is a freelance psychoanalyst and wrier. After studying English at the University of Oxford, he trained as a child psychotherapist and became Principal Child Psychotherapist at Charing Cross Hospital in London. He is the author of nineteen books, including: Winnicott (1988), On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored (1993), Monogamy (1996), Houdini’s Box (2001), Missing Out (2012), One Way and Another (2013). A regular contributor to the London Review of Books, Raritan, and The Threepenny Review, Phillips is also the general editor of new translations of Freud’s work published by the Penguin Press.

Dr Monica Pearl is Lecturer in Twentieth Century American Literature at the University of Manchester. She is the author of AIDS Literature and Gay Identity: The Literature of Loss (Routledge, 2013) and essays on the graphic memoir Fun Home, the play Angels in America, the writing of W.G. Sebald, and opera.

Professor Ian Parker is Professor of Management in the School of Management at the University of Leicester, Co-Director of the Discourse Unit (www.discourseunit.com), secretary of Manchester Psychoanalytic Matrix and a practising psychoanalyst in Manchester. He is also Honorary Professor of Education at the University of Manchester. His recent books include Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Revolutions in Subjectivity (Routledge, 2011), and six books in the series ‘Psychology after Critique’ (Routledge, 2015).

3.30-5.30pm, 4 February 2015

University Place Lecture Theatre A,

University of Manchester

Followed by wine reception at Cafe Muse.

For more information: email: clara.bradbury-rance@manchester.ac.uk, go to www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/cidral/ or tweet @cidral_uom


Apr 5 2014

Getting Over Freud

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Reading and Interpretation: Getting Over Freud is a discussion group for staff and postgraduate students interested in questions about how we read literature.

This series of seminars will look at contemporary writers, such as Martin Hägglund and Adam Phillips, who have challenged our strategies of reading and ways of interpreting everything from death and dreams to sex and selfhood. The focus of discussion will be topics such as: should we read for surface or for depth? Does a text have an unconscious? And do texts say what they mean or mean what they say? We might all be reading after Freud, but the thinkers this series will explore are all getting one over, getting out from under, or getting (a leg) over Freudian modes of interpretation.

In the next meeting, Dr Ziad Elmarsafy (University of York) will be introducing a seminar looking at Edward Said as a reader, focusing on the essay ‘Secular Criticism’ from The World, the Text, and the Critic. Dr Elmarsafy, a Reader in the English Department at the University of York, is the author of The Enlightenment Qur’an (2009) and Sufism in the Contemporary Arabic Novel (2012), and co-editor of Debating Orientalism (2013) and the forthcoming collection What Postcolonial Theory Doesn’t Say.

Future speakers include: Professor Hugh Haughton (introducing three essays by Adam Phillips); Professor Derek Attridge, (introducing a chapter from his forthcoming book, The Work of Literature) and Dr Nicholas Ray (introducing Jean Laplanche’s essay, ‘The Unfinished Copernican Revolution’). Please see Events page for further details.

Monday, 5th May, 6:30pm.

Room BS/007, Berrick Saul Building, Heslington West Campus, University of York.

For more information and copies of readings, please contact Alex Alonso (aa611@york.ac.uk) or Doug Battersby (djmb501@york.ac.uk).

Interested staff and postgraduate students from all universities are welcome to attend.