Jan 19 2016

Isaac Julien’s KAPITAL

timthumb

 

A screening of Isaac Julien’s installation KAPITAL followed by a discussion with Isaac Julien and Mark Nash (Royal College of Art), chaired by Jackie Stacey (University of Manchester) at the Whitworth Gallery, Manchester.

KAPITAL is a two-screen work centering around a conversation at the Hayward Gallery, London between Isaac Julien and renowned Marxist academic David Harvey (author of the book The Enigma of Capital). Julien opens the film by asking why capital is so difficult to depict, to which Harvey deftly replies: “in the same way you can only really intuit gravity exists by its effects, you can really only intuit that capital exists by its effects.” Staged as part of a seminar entitled Choreographing Capital organised by the artist at the Hayward Gallery in 2012, the event saw notable interventions from theorists, critics and curators such as the late Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Irit Rogoff and Colin MacCabe. Julien has always made work in collaboration, conversation and exchange but this is the first time he has opened up the complex and rigorous research processes that lie behind his working methods.

Isaac Julien was born in 1960 in London, where he currently lives and works. Julien was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2001 for his films The Long Road to Mazatlán (1999), made in collaboration with Javier de Frutos and Vagabondia (2000), choreographed by Javier de Frutos. Earlier works include Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996), Young Soul Rebels (1991) which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival the same year, and the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), which also won several international awards. Julien was visiting lecturer at Harvard University’s Schools of Afro-American and Visual Environmental Studies between 1998 and 2002. He was also a research fellow at Goldsmiths College, University of London (2000-2005), and is currently both faculty member at the Whitney Museum of American Arts and Professor of Media Art at Staatliche Hoscschule fur Gestaltung Karlsruhe, Germany. He was the recipient of the Performa Award (2008), the prestigious MIT Eugene McDermott Award in the Arts (2001) and the Frameline Lifetime Achievement Award (2002). His work Paradise Omeros was presented as part of Documenta XI in Kassel (2002). In 2003 he won the Grand Jury Prize at the Kunstfilm Biennale in Cologne for his single screen version of Baltimore; in 2008, he received a Special Teddy for his film that he collaborated on with Tilda Swinton, on Derek Jarman, called Derek, at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Mark Nash is an independent curator and writer, until recently Professor and Head of Department, Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art London. He collaborated with Okwui Enwezor on the Arena Programme for the 2015 Venice Biennale, The Short Century exhibition and Documenta11, both 2002 and Ute Meta Bauer on the 3rd Berlin Biennial 2004. He has written extensively on artists’ work with the moving image – both in his Experiments with Truth (Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philaelphia 2004-5 and his One Sixth of the Earth, ecologies of image at ZKM, Karlsruhe and MUSAC, León. This latter exhibition focused on the artistic legacy of the formerly socialist countries, previously explored in Reimagining October at Calvert 22 2009 (curated with Isaac Julien). Most recently, Mark Nash was also co-director with Isaac Julien of a series of live readings of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital as part of the 56th edition of La Bienniale di Venezia in 2015 and is currently curating Things Fall Apart, opening at Calvert 22 in February 2016. He is currently working on two exhibitions: Things Fall Apart for Calvert22, London and Iwalewa House, Bayreuth in 2016 and The Shadow Never Lies (with Joshua Jiang) for Minsheng2, Shanghai in 2016. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the Nanyang Technological University and Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore as well as a visiting lecturer on the Film Curating MA at Birkbeck University of London, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.

7-9 pm, Thursday, 25th February 2016 

The Whitworth Gallery

Manchester

This event is free and no tickets are needed, but arrive early to avoid disappointment.

Presented by CIDRAL and The Whitworth Art Gallery

For further information: see:http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/cidral/events/

 


Oct 2 2015

Writing, Drawing and Roland Barthes

Incontro con Italo Calvino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Writing and Drawing:

Theorizing and Practicing Creativity with Roland Barthes

A One-day Symposium at Lancaster University

This interdisciplinary symposium places Roland Barthes’s theoretical writings on forms of creativity alongside his lesser known, but substantial, archive of drawings. Although, or perhaps precisely because, Barthes did not consider his drawings to be ‘art’, they can be viewed through the lens of his work on the neutral, textual pleasure, and authorship, and may even be seen to throw their own light on these theories. Assessing the role of such alternative texts in the oeuvre of one influential thinker also encourages us to think more broadly about how creative processes can both unfold within and shift across multiple media. Our presentations explore the work of further writers and artists who employ multiple media, as well as considering the theoretical and practical shifts that have occurred in our understanding of the underlying concepts of ‘text’ and ‘author’ since the advent of digital media and platforms.

2015 is the centenary year of Barthes’s birth and this event takes place on the date of his birth. The symposium is a collaboration between Insight, a creative research centre based at the Lancaster Institute for Contemporary Arts, Lancaster University and Authors and the World, an AHRC-funded collaboration between researchers in the departments of European Languages & Culture, English & Creative Writing, Linguistics and Contemporary Arts at Lancaster University.

Speakers:

Charlie Gere (Lancaster University), Delphine Grass (Lancaster University), Beth Harland (Lancaster University), Sunil Manghani (University of Southampton), Eric Robertson (Royal Holloway University). Chair: Rebecca Braun (Lancaster University)

Artworks exhibited by Jean Arp (works from the Peter Scott collection), Sally Morfill (Manchester Metropolitan University) and Ana Čavić.

12 November 2015, 11.00 – 18.00

Peter Scott Gallery, Lancaster University

Lunch and refreshments will be provided. The event is free but you need to book a place at: https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on/on-writing-and-drawing-roland-barthes-symposium

 


Apr 16 2015

Anne-Lise Francois on Climate Change

Unknown

 

‘Climate Change and the Cumulus of History’

A lecture by Professor Anne-Lise Francois (University of California, Berkeley) at the University of Leeds

Anne-Lise Francois is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Her book Open Secrets: The Literature of Uncounted Experience (Stanford UP, 2007) was awarded the René Wellek prize for Comparative Literature in 2010.

Thursday, 7th May 5.15 pm.

Seminar Room 5,

School of English,

University of Leeds.

This talk is generously funded by the Leverhulme Foundation.


Jun 11 2014

Simon Swift on Romanticism

ArendtWordsworth

 

 

‘Hannah Arendt and Wordsworth’s The Ruined Cottage: Ruin, Ruination, Culture’

Dr Simon Swift (University of Leeds)

Simon Swift is Senior Lecturer in Critical and Cultural Theory at the University of Leeds. He is the author of Romanticism, Literature and Philosophy: Expressive Rationality in Rousseau, Kant, Wollstonecraft and Contemporary Theory and Hannah Arendt.

10 am – 1 pm, Thursday 26th June

Institute of Advanced Study

Millburn House

University of Warwick


May 10 2014

Svetlana Boym on Ruins

15-nostaglic2-450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Embarrassing Monumentality in the Wake of the Cold War’

A Public Lecture at the University of Manchester by Svetlana Boym (Harvard University)

This lecture explores the ruins of modernity and metamorphosis of monuments across media—in public art, architecture and literature. It proposes an alternative off-modern history of the Cold War period beyond ruinophilia and iconoclasm. The discussion will examine the ‘monument to the Cold War’ and the embarrassing monumentality in the works by Robert Smithson, Vladimir Nabokov, Pussy Riots and others.

Svetlana Boym is a writer, theorist, and artist. Her books include The Future of Nostalgia (2001); Another Freedom: The Alternative History of an Idea (2010); Architecture of the Off-Modern (2008); Territories of Terror: Memories and Mythologies of Gulag in Contemporary Art (2006); the novel Ninochka (2003) and the play The Woman Who Shot Lenin. Among her exhibitions are Off-Modern: Ruins of the Future (Moscow Biennial, 2013); Phantasmagorias of History (Watchtower, off-Berlin Biennale, 2010); and Hydrants Immigrants (Parson’s School of Design in New York City, 2011). Boym is the Curt Hugo Reisinger Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literatures at Harvard University and a faculty associate of the Graduate School of Design and Architecture. Native of St Petersburg, Russia, she lives in Boston, USA and at www.svetlanaboym.com

5-7pm Tuesday 13th May

John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Building

University of Manchester