Feb 22 2015

Derrida’s Faith and Knowledge: A Workshop

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Re-reading Derrida’s ‘Faith and Knowledge’

A Northern Theory School/Department of Theology and Religious Studies Workshop at the University of Nottingham

In his enigmatic 1994 essay ‘Faith and Knowledge: The Two Sources of “Religion” within the Limits of Reason Alone’, Jacques Derrida explores the troubled place of religion in late modernity. If Derrida’s essay largely precedes the ‘post-secular’ turn in contemporary thought, it anticipates many of post-secularism’s defining concerns and questions: secularisation, ‘globalatinzation’, the return of the religious, the ‘religion’ of technological modernity, religious fundamentalism, violence and terror.

This workshop will be the first ever event dedicated to exploring the implications of Derrida’s landmark essay 20 years after its original publication. What is the significance of Derrida’s essay today? How do his reflections upon religion anticipate, deepen or question the turn to religion in figures like Habermas or Taylor? To what extent might Derrida’s essay  (which also contains important reflections on Kant, Bergson, Heidegger and Levinas) serve as a point of departure to explore the past, present and future of philosophy of religion?

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that address any aspect of Derrida’s ‘Faith and Knowledge’ and/or use the text as a point of departure to address larger questions such as secularisation, the messianic, political theology, reason, technology, religious violence and terror. This workshop is free and open to all.

Speakers include:

Agata Bielik-Robson, Arthur Bradley, Joseph Cohen, Joanna Hodge, Adam Lipszyc, Laurent Milesi, Christopher Müller, Danielle Sands, Donovan Schaefer, Daniel Weiss, Raphael Zagury-Orly.

In order to register, please contact Agata Bielik-Robson [Agata.Bielik-Robson@nottingham.ac.uk]

June 1st-2nd 2015

Department of Theology and Religious Studies

Room A100, Law and Social Sciences Building, Monday-Tuesday

University of Nottingham


Oct 27 2014

Commemorating Derrida

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A Symposium on the Legacy of Jacques Derrida at the University of York

Speakers:

Arthur Bradley (Lancaster University)

John Bowen (University of York)

Ziad Elmarsafy (University of York)

Jacques Derrida’s writings have provoked strong feelings among critics of all stripes. In this special event to commemorate Derrida ten years after his death, three distinguished speakers will address how his writing has affected the ways they think and write about literature. More often heatedly discussed than closely read, Derrida’s prose poses a singular challenge to a group dedicated to questions of interpretation. Each of our speakers will therefore discuss a single page of Derrida, outlining how it has influenced the ways they read.

Arthur Bradley (Lancaster) will address an excerpt from Of Grammatology, John Bowen (York) a page from The Post Card, and Ziad Elmarsafy (York) a passage from ‘Hospitality’. These short presentations will be followed by open discussion. We hope this event will provide an accessible approach to a thinker whose name is often considered synonymous with difficulty and obscurity. All comers are welcome, from the post-structural sceptic to the deconstruction devotee. This event will take place at the University of York from 6:00pm on Wednesday 12 November.

This event is part of the Reading and Interpretation event series for staff and postgraduates interested in questions about how and why we read literature. For more information about the group and copies of reading material please visit our website or contact Alex Alonso or Doug Battersby.

The Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building

University of York

12 November 6:00pm

 


Sep 22 2014

Modern Tragedy: Antigone in Contemporary Thinking

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A Symposium with Professor Kathrin Rosenfield (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) at Lancaster University.

Speakers:

Kathrin Rosenfield (University of Rio Grande do Sul)

Michael Dillon (Lancaster University)

James Smith (University of Exeter)

Hegel calls the ‘heavenly’ Antigone ‘the most magnificent figure ever to have appeared on earth’. Hölderlin brought this heavenly figure to life all over again in a startlingly original German translation of Sophocles’ play, at the time dismissed by the circle around Goethe as unorthodox.  Heidegger, Derrida, Butler – indeed successive waves of German, French and Anglophone writers – have revisited both the play and the figure to develop interpretations across the spectrum of contemporary thought.  Antigone and her meaning (or the absence of any) haunts the thought of modernity.

Lancaster University, in conjunction with the Northern Theory School, has invited Professor Kathrin Rosenfield to present the fruits of more than a decade’s research into the Greek and German presentation of Antigone at a public event on Friday, 28th November. In addition to invited speakers, we also welcome brief contributions to the day (papers of 15 minutes maximum) on any aspect of Antigone, on Hölderlin or Hegel’s understanding of ‘the tragic’, and on the contemporary reception of her person, the play, or its tragic consequences, for consideration for inclusion in the event.

Kathrin Rosenfield is Professor in the Faculty of Literature and Philosophy at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil.  Educated in Salzburg, Vienna and Paris, she has authored two books on Sophocles and Hölderlin: Antigone: Sophocles’ Art, Hölderlin’s Insight (Aurora CO: Davies, 2010) and Oedipus Rex: The Story of a Palace Intrigue (Aurora CO: Davies, 2012).  Both books were simultaneously published in French. As well as being a philosopher and literary theorist, Kathrin Rosenfield is an accomplished performance artist.  Her book Desenverdando Rosa won Brazil’s foremost literary award in 2007.

Please note: attendance at the event is free, but requires advance registration. Please contact either Laurence Hemming (l.p.hemming@lancaster.ac.uk) or Arthur Bradley (a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk) to register.

1.00 pm – 5 pm, Friday 28th November

Management School Lecture Theatre 9

Lancaster University


May 10 2014

Political Theology and Modernity: The Legacy of Carl Schmitt

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A One Day Research Symposium at Lancaster University with Professor William Rasch (Indiana University)

The Northern Theory School in conjunction with the Journal for Cultural Research (Taylor & Francis) and the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University is pleased to announce a one-day research symposium on Political Theology and Modernity: The Legacy of Carl Schmitt. Its keynote speaker will be Professor William Rasch (Indiana) and other speakers will include Agata Bielik-Robson (Nottingham), Michael Dillon (Lancaster) and Michael Hoelzl (Manchester). This event will be of interest to academics and graduate students interested in the legacy of Carl Schmitt, political theology and the relationship between religion and politics more widely.

William Rasch is Professor of Germanic Studies in the Department of Germanic Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of Niklas Luhmann’s Modernity: The Paradoxes of Differentiation (Stanford UP, 2001) and Sovereignty and its Discontents: On the Primacy of Conflict and the Structure of the Political (Birkbeck Law Press, 2004). He is Visiting Professor at Lancaster University in June 2014.

Monday 9th June 9. 30 am -5. 30 pm

Lecture Theatre 6, Management School

Lancaster University

This event is free and open to all but space is limited. In order to register, please contact Laurence Hemming (l.p.hemming@lancaster.ac.uk) or Arthur Bradley (a.h.bradley@lancaster.ac.uk).